Tuesday 121515

HOUSTON, TX - NOVEMBER 22: Clarence Cummings Jr. of the United States competes in the men's 69kg weight class during the 2015 International Weightlifting Federation World Championships at the George R. Brown Convention Center on November 22, 2015 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX – NOVEMBER 22: Clarence Cummings Jr. of the United States competes in the men’s 69kg weight class during the 2015 International Weightlifting Federation World Championships at the George R. Brown Convention Center on November 22, 2015 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

I was absolutely floored to see the weight this kid professional athlete puts up, C.J. Cummings. Featured Athlete on USA Weightlifting… teamusa.org.  Headlines read “15-Year-Old Weightlifting Prodigy CJ Cummings Is Youngest At World Championships” Click to read more.

BBGYMNASTICS:
Clean & Jerk: 2X1@70%, 2X1@75%, 2X2+1@80%, 2X1@90%, 2X2+1@80%, 1X1@85%, 1X1@90%
*Keep rest under 2 minutes

STRENGTH:
Deadlift: 5×3 @85%
*All sets exactly 85%.. for all same weight. Keep rest under 3 minutes.

METCON A:
10 min AMRAP:
5 Push Press (175/115) *must start on ground
15 burpees to plate
200m Run

INTERVAL WORK:
For Time:
15 Toes to Bar
25 HSPU
Rest 2:00
20 Toes to Bar
20 HSPU
Rest 2:00
25 Toes to Bar
15 HSPU

ENDURANCE WORK:
ASSAULT BIKE
1 mile x 3
*Rest 1:1

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Tuesday 10262015

Andrew Ramirez who defines what mental strength means repping 275x4 OHS
Andrew Ramirez who defines what mental strength means repping 275×4 OHS

BBGYMNASTICS:
5×1 – 3 Position Clean (Floor, Hang, Hip) @ 80%

STRENGTH:
5×1 – Push Press + Push Jerk + Split Jerk – AHAP

MET-CON:
3 Rounds of:
20 Lateral Over the Bar Burpees
30 Wall balls (25/20)
10 Sumo Deadlift High Pulls (95/65)

ENDURANCE:
1000M Row
Rest 3 minutes
700M Row
Rest 2 minutes
500M Row
Rest 1 minute
250M Row

Monday 05042015

A) BB Gymnastics:
1) Every 30 seconds for 4 minutes:
1 Power Snatch + 2 Behind-the-Neck Push Presses @ 75%
*Notes: This should be completed as a complex. The bar should be lowered to the back rack after the Power Snatch, and the Push Presses should be performed with a Snatch grip.

2) Every 30 seconds for 4 minutes:
2 Power Cleans + 1 Push Jerk @ 70%

B) Strength:
1) 5 x 2 – Front Squat – start at 80% and increase AHAP

C) Met-Con:
15 minute AMRAP of:
5 Thrusters (135/95)
10 Burpee Box Jumps (24″/20″)
20 Box Step Overs w/ 30/20# med ball
400m Run

D) Extra:
10 minute AMRAP of:
6 HSPU (6″/4″ deficit)
20 (steps) BB Walking Lunges (front rack) (95/65#)
40 Double-Unders

Fatigue, Over training and when to stop

Thank you all for the response that we’ve gotten.

I’ve gotten a lot of questions about rest days. It’s simple really; Thursday and Sundays are rest days. These are pretty consistent other than a few recovery Workouts or activities I’ll throw in there once in a while (get your swimming trunks on).  There has been great success with the 3 on 1 off, 2 on 1 off schedule.

If you miss a training day during the weekly cycle you may make it up on a rest day, but be cautious to not try to do too much makeup on a rest day. I would benefit more by taking an extra rest day than try to to do 2 days of work in one day.

If you’re serious, rest days can be the absolute worst. Rather than enjoying the day off, we spend the free hours in torture, just imagining what we could do if we could get our hands on some weights. When that mindset takes over, rest days go out the window. We’re in the gym hour after hour, day after day in order to feed our inner iron demon.

I overheard a conversation between two guys discussing how they’ve been everyday “balls-out” at the gym and don’t seem to get over the hump. Going ALL-out every single day can be severely HARMFUL. A lack of proper recovery and conditioning can lead to plateaus and injuries; not to mention your IRON ADDICTION can also affect your friends and family.

Fatigue, Over training and when to stop

As the saying goes, “It is not how hard you train, but how well you recover.” I agree completely. If you don’t recover well, you won’t experience the strength, power, or endurance adaptations you’re in the gym for. That’s why I think it’s very important to take a break from lifting at least twice per week. You can still get into the gym—I’ll show you what those off days should look like—but you need to allow your body to recover from the stress of moving heavy weight.

Many of you have just started the Irongrip Training System. Many of you are already wrecked. That’s ok. You’re supposed to be. We have found that there is a legitimate 2 to 4 week adaptation period. During this time you may feel run down, weak or just simply wrecked. It will go away. This will be an incredible amount of volume of weightlifting for many of you. The fatigue you experience will be completely different than the fatigue you’ve have from a grouping of high-rep metcons or some sort of a distant event.

I can’t tell you when to stop because I don’t know what you’re feeling, but I will say this; If you break form because of fatigue and injure yourself, you’re not going to be competing or doing anything for awhile… “yes DAD!” … Yes, I just sounded like your dad only cooler, but common sense is common sense. It’s a new program for some of you and positive adaptation only comes when you’re not in a full body cast.

-Coach Mitch